The Fragile Paradise

The Fragile Paradise uses large–format, often award winning photographs and film footage to illustrate the unique beauty of our planet. But the exhibition also shows the consequences of human activity: the impact of climate change, industrial agriculture and the clearing of the tropical rainforest in the age of the Anthropocene – in the age of human beings.

Copyright: Doug Gimesy – Die Pinguine von St. Kilda

Copyright: Doug Gimesy – Die Pinguine von St. Kilda

Copyright: Johan Georget – Magischer Moment in Etosha

Copyright: Johan Georget – Magischer Moment in Etosha

No species has ever changed the Earth as much as humans. Forests are being cut down, and oceans filled with garbage. The climate is warming, the ice at the poles is melting. But more and more people are becoming aware of the fragility of our home planet. They are working on ideas and solutions to preserve the Earth for future generations. Contemporary humanity with its capabilities is capable of stoping climate change and rescuing nature. „The Fragile Paradise“ is an exhibition presented by the Oberhausen Gasometer in cooperation with the German Aerospace Centre (DLR).

Copyright: Solvin Zankl – Fleißiges Bienchen

Copyright: Solvin Zankl – Fleißiges Bienchen

Copyright: Marcel van Oosten – Makake 4.0

Copyright: Marcel van Oosten – Makake 4.0

Copyright: Marcio Cabral – Wunderkerzen im Cerrado

Copyright: Marcio Cabral – Wunderkerzen im Cerrado

The highlight of the exhibition is in the 100 metre high air space of the Gasometer is a monumental sculpture of the Earth onto which high-resolution satellite images are projected. From the perspective of the astronauts we see clouds and rivers, we recognise the continents in the alternation of day and night and in the change of seasons. But we can also perceive what we can only see with the eyes of the satellites: Ocean currents, temperature differences, air traffic.

Copyright: Monika Schneider

Welcome to Paradise

The world is changing: Between global catastrophes and rapid technological progress, people are creating digital spaces for dreams and utopias. What does it mean to be human in this new world and what if the dreamscape turns into a nightmare? The exhibition Welcome to Paradise is an immersive, interactive media art course that takes you into fictional worlds between utopia and dystopia and invites you to engage in an artistic experiment and a multi-sensory experience.

NORIYUKI SUZUKI  (*1985, Fukushima, Japan) 2019 Installation

Steel, plastic, wood, various computers, cameras, apple. Courtesy the artist

The installation * (asterisk) raises the question of what remains of an apple when it is stripped of its individual and cultural meanings. Based on its shape, colour and internalised experience, the viewer assumes it is an ordinary apple. Noriyuki Suzuki is interested in the intangible, ambiguous and complex relationships between people, technology, and society.

With his installation, the Germany-based Japanese artist explores the question of whether we are really looking at the familiar fruit or rather at a placeholder for something completely different. The title of the work refers to a wildcard character in software, where the asterisk serves as a placeholder and as a search function.

Part of the work is an armillary sphere, an astronomical device, formerly also known as world machine, which serves to represent the movement of celestial bodies. Thanks to its infinite rotational possibilities, the armillary sphere is able to show the apple from all sides. It rotates it through 360 degrees while cameras scan the surface in real-time. In this way, countless visual data points are collected while computers match their similarity to those of other apples. The calculations and the camera images are shown on four screens. The apple is visually and materially fragmented in order to view it anew as an object and to suspend conventional categorisations and associations.

Website: noriyukisuzuki.com


Between the Clouds 2021,  A.A MURAKAMI  Alexander Groves (*1983, Bromley, England), Azusa Murakami (*1984, Nagoya, Japan) Mixed-Media Installation, Courtesy of the artists and Superblue

In the exhibition space, A.A. Murakami erect a machine generating fog patches and fragrant rings of fog. Their work Between the Clouds (2021) references the earth`s earliest life-forms, nourished by sulphur springs in the deep seas, and it allows nature and technology to merge into a new, artificially produced entity. 

The machine creates an atmosphere of more than four trillion years ago in an aesthetic interplay of colour and light. Through the fog, fragrances of fruit, plants, wood and grass emerge. Led by one of our most elementary and emotionally connected sensory perceptions, visitors stroll through an artificial Garden of Eden. 

A.A. Murakami is a collaboration between Japanese architect Azusa Murakami and British artist Alexander Groves, known also as Studio Swine for their interdisciplinary work at the interface of art, architecture, and science.

Website: studioswine.com

RAUMZEITPIRATEN, Tobias Daemgen (*1980, Braunschweig), Jan Ehlen (*1980, Bergisch Gladbach) and Moritz Ellerich (*1982, Haan)

Drafts for Zero Gravity / Hybrid 2, 2021 Mixed media installation
Courtesy the artists

“We deny the regency of the right angle … Everything in motion … The big stumbling … Symmetry and consonance fade to background noise … Gravitation is no more … Above and beneath, ahead and behind are relative … The big rooting in all directions.”

Weightlessness changes perception. It does away with notions of up and down – spatial order and orientation dissolve. With their performance machines made of scaffolding poles, loudspeakers, LEDs, mirrors, motors and electronics, the artists’ collective RaumZeitPiraten (Space Time Pirates) attempts to disrupt the established order by means of weightlessness and to put up and down into perspective. Using various image and sound sensors, their expansive constructions pick up on stimuli from their surroundings – for example, the movements of visitors or changes in sound intensity – and process them into new chaotic collages. 

Together, the RaumZeitPiraten design site-specific mixed media installations that create alternative worlds to the relationship between man and machine.

Website: raumzeitpiraten.com


Paradise Stream 2021, Tina Malburg (*1988, Arnsberg), Emil Cyrill Gerhardt (*1991, Düsseldorf), MIREVI, University of Applied Sciences Düsseldorf

Interactive light projection
Courtesy the artists, MIREVI (University of Applied Sciences Düsseldorf)

The waters of Paradise Stream tumble and spill inexorably across the wall and floor of the exhibition space. The artificial water surface responds to the visitors. Their movements and the shadows they cast change the direction of the flow. In this light projection by exhibition designer Tina Malburg and physicist and digital media scientist Emil Cyrill Gerhardt, visitors can touch the fictive water surface and create something new through acts of interference.

Website: mirevi.de


Textquellen: NRW Forum Düsseldorf


The most beautiful Staircases in Hamburg

The most modern buildings in the city of Hamburg, this locations are stunning both inside and out. The spiral staircases seamlessly wraps around the architecture, creating movement among stagnant objects. I am fascinated by the impressive architecture and the symmetry of the curved shapes. From simple and beautiful to colorful tiles to perfect proportions. But where in Hamburg do you find the most beautiful staircases?  In this small guide I‘ll show you some great locations.

International Photography Awards Winner

Dermatologikum (Stephansplatz) Copyright: Monika Schneider

Dermatologikum (Stephansplatz) Copyright: Monika Schneider

Sprinkenhof, Copyright: Monika Schneider

Sprinkenhof, Copyright: Monika Schneider

Sprinkenhof, Copyright: Monika Schneider

Sprinkenhof, Copyright: Monika Schneider

Brahms Kontor, Copyright: Monika Schneider

Brahms Kontor, Copyright: Monika Schneider

Ballin Haus, Copyright: Monika Schneider

Ballin Haus, Copyright: Monika Schneider

Versmannhaus, Copyright: Monika Schneider

Versmannhaus, Copyright: Monika Schneider